Monthly Archives: December 2011

Creator Interview: Magda Boreysza

© Magda Boreysza
© Magda Boreysza

Magda Boreysza is a comic artist, animator and illustrator.  She divides her time between Edinburgh, Sweden and New Orleans.  Magda’s comic series ‘Toastycats’ is soon to reach its sixth issue, for more info check out Magda’s blog and website.

What are you working on at the moment?

I’m putting together the 6th issue of Toastycats, which will have more pages and more colour than previous ones. I’m also developing ideas for graphic novels. I’m generating a lot of ideas in general, and trying to organize myself so as to actually get those projects done.

Some people feel that the word ‘comics’ comes with some unfortunate stigma they would rather be without and prefer terms such as ‘sequential art’ or narrative ‘illustration’- where do you stand on that debate?

I’m often hesitant to use the word ‘comic’ when I describe what I do to people who have little contact with the form. But I’m equally uncomfortable with ‘sequential art’ or ‘narrative illustration’. Those are incredibly dry terms and make comics sound like a total drag. So I do say comics. It’s short and it has a good ring to it. We need to use the word until it looses its association with comedy and funny papers.

Do you have a specific grand plan in mind for Toastycats or do you just work on it as and when it seems appropriate?

It’s certainly something that I plan to continue for a long time, and I would like to publish it more consistently than I do now. I think that it improves with each issue. When I first started, there was no plan at all. I didn’t think that there would be more than one issue. Then I made another one, and another… with each, I’m getting a better idea of what I want to do. There’s been a lot of experimentation, and some things worked while some didn’t. I think that I painted myself into a corner, somewhat, with The Seed, because it just keeps expanding and I feel like I need to continue it in each issue, when I would actually much prefer to have all the issues be self-contained. So, I’m contemplating whether I should remove The Seed and just publish it separately as a graphic novel.

I also try to improve the print quality. I think that I’ve hit a point at which it makes more sense to have Toastycats printed lithographically, which has given the whole endeavour a real boost. At some point I might start experimenting with the form a little more. We’ll see.

What was the last comic you read and what did you think of it?

I recently read ‘Laika’ by Nick Abadzis. It’s such a well crafted story, and very moving. I was floored.

Peanuts or Calvin & Hobbes? Discuss

Both. They are both great.

Fumio’s first book is gradually coming!

It showed up in Amazon Canada, because Fumio’s publisher is in Quebec.

http://www.amazon.ca/INCROYABLE-HISTOIRE-SAUCE-SOYA-L/dp/292258593X

If you google ‘l’incroyable histoire de la sauce soya’ (the incredible tale of the soya sauce)you can see some extracts and check out the stocks in book retailers.Fumio is flattered.

Extracts link http://www.scribd.com/doc/63646412/Sauce-Soja-Extraits

If you are interested in his publisher this is their website http://www.lapasteque.com/Accueil.html

Fumio is going off to the international festival of comic books in Angouleme in Farnce again at the end of January.http://www.bdangouleme.com/

Anyone going there too, Fumio wants to catch up and he looks forwards to the update about it.

Later!

Creator Interview: Malcy Duff

Excerpt from 'The Weather and The Weather Forecast' (c) Malcy Duff

Malcy Duff is a comix creator, artist and musician currently working from edinburgh.  We recently sent a few questions his way via email to catch up on what he is up to- enjoy!

If you want to find out more about Malcy’s past and future work please check out his blog.  His new comix ‘The Weather and The Weather Forecast’, ‘Faded Book Spine’, and ‘Writing Postcards in the Visitor Centre’ can all be obtained by emailing the contact details on his website

What are you working on at the moment?

I have this rule where by I don’t tell anyone the project I’m working on because if I do it will never get finished, so….

In the past you have exhibited your work in a gallery setting as well as through publications- where, if anywhere do you see your non-printed work developing in the future?

I’ve had an idea but again I better not say.


What degree of similarity is there between the way you create your music and your comics?
I think a massive degree.  I’ve often thought one way people could read my comix is as if they are music.  My favourite artists who work in a number of mediums, you can tell it’s them when you look at their art, whatever the medium.  Maybe they made a painting.  Then a bike wheel.  Then a remote control.  Then a cake.  And you know by looking at each piece of work that it’s them.  It’s hard to understand what it is about the work, but it’s definitely them.  These are intuitive emissions and shouldn’t be overanalyzed.  I think when you do overanalyze these things you can start to create parodies. I hope if you listen to my music you can hear, if you wish, the connections yourself.  The process is probably similar in the way that I form ideas and develop or improvise on top of them.  The major difference is that mostly I will work collaboratively on music and that changes things slightly.  Control is easier to lose when you work with someone else, and that’s a guid thing to lose.

What do you feel the differences are between comics and comix?
If you dig under the last letter of comix you will find some treasure.

Peanuts or Calvin & Hobbes? Discuss

If you’re asking me to choose one I would choose Peanuts.  I have a nostalgia for Calvin and Hobbes but only because my brother read it when we were growing up and Calvin really reminds me of him.  I never really liked it very much.  I like pictures of snow so it coaxed me in sometimes, but the snow seemed to be the only thing I could relate to.  I’m looking at the light from this computer screen light up my hands and I can see all the wrinkles, crosses, pimples, lines going through my nails, jim henson rocks, wisps… clearly, all over my hands as they age.  There are 60s compilations of Peanuts with these really clunky Ben-Day dots for shading which they themselves become characters and abstract forms in the strips.  They make it look like the book has acne.  That’s why I choose Peanuts.