Tag Archives: Edinburgh

Creator Interview: Malcy Duff

Excerpt from 'The Weather and The Weather Forecast' (c) Malcy Duff

Malcy Duff is a comix creator, artist and musician currently working from edinburgh.  We recently sent a few questions his way via email to catch up on what he is up to- enjoy!

If you want to find out more about Malcy’s past and future work please check out his blog.  His new comix ‘The Weather and The Weather Forecast’, ‘Faded Book Spine’, and ‘Writing Postcards in the Visitor Centre’ can all be obtained by emailing the contact details on his website

What are you working on at the moment?

I have this rule where by I don’t tell anyone the project I’m working on because if I do it will never get finished, so….

In the past you have exhibited your work in a gallery setting as well as through publications- where, if anywhere do you see your non-printed work developing in the future?

I’ve had an idea but again I better not say.


What degree of similarity is there between the way you create your music and your comics?
I think a massive degree.  I’ve often thought one way people could read my comix is as if they are music.  My favourite artists who work in a number of mediums, you can tell it’s them when you look at their art, whatever the medium.  Maybe they made a painting.  Then a bike wheel.  Then a remote control.  Then a cake.  And you know by looking at each piece of work that it’s them.  It’s hard to understand what it is about the work, but it’s definitely them.  These are intuitive emissions and shouldn’t be overanalyzed.  I think when you do overanalyze these things you can start to create parodies. I hope if you listen to my music you can hear, if you wish, the connections yourself.  The process is probably similar in the way that I form ideas and develop or improvise on top of them.  The major difference is that mostly I will work collaboratively on music and that changes things slightly.  Control is easier to lose when you work with someone else, and that’s a guid thing to lose.

What do you feel the differences are between comics and comix?
If you dig under the last letter of comix you will find some treasure.

Peanuts or Calvin & Hobbes? Discuss

If you’re asking me to choose one I would choose Peanuts.  I have a nostalgia for Calvin and Hobbes but only because my brother read it when we were growing up and Calvin really reminds me of him.  I never really liked it very much.  I like pictures of snow so it coaxed me in sometimes, but the snow seemed to be the only thing I could relate to.  I’m looking at the light from this computer screen light up my hands and I can see all the wrinkles, crosses, pimples, lines going through my nails, jim henson rocks, wisps… clearly, all over my hands as they age.  There are 60s compilations of Peanuts with these really clunky Ben-Day dots for shading which they themselves become characters and abstract forms in the strips.  They make it look like the book has acne.  That’s why I choose Peanuts.

Event Report – Lazy Sunday Comics at the Forest Cafe.

It’s been a while since this event, but we’ve all been so busy working on our own comics, that none of us have had the time to write about this fantastic event.

It was the closing weekend of the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, and we arranged an afternoon of relaxed comics drawing for adults at the now sadly closed Forest Cafe.  It was a great event, with lots of interest as people passed by on a dreich Sunday, looking for something simple and fun to do on a quiet weekend day.

The atmosphere was great, with comic book movies playing on a TV in the background, people hanging around and flipping through a batch of comics we brought as inspiration, and best of all people pitching in and creating characters and telling stories with comics.


Best of all was our fantastic comics wall.  We stuck up big strips of paper on the room’s walls and had a central starting panel from which people could branch off and tell their own stories.  The thing was a huge success, and a number of weird stories emerged from the single originating panel.  These tales even intertwined at moments, making for a really special and unique group creation.  It’s a game we’ll definitely play again at one of these events.

All in all a great event.  Thanks to the folk at the Forest for having us, and to all the people who came along and made it a great day.

From Scotland to Japan – An Interview With Sean Michael Wilson

Sean Michael Wilson is a manga and comics writer who grew up in Edinburgh, and made the move to Japan where he has made it big in the manga world.  He is the writer of a number of successful manga including ‘Yakuza Moon’ and ‘Hagakure’.  He is the editor of the Harvey Award nominated anthology ‘AX: Alternative Manga’.  We got in touch to ask him about his experiences as an international writer and editor.  Here he discusses his work, and also announces a very exciting opportunity for Scotland based artists.  Read on!

What comics did you grow up reading, and what has influenced you work most?

Like most kids in Scotland and the rest of the UK I grew up reading comics as a matter of course. It was Whizzer and Chips and Victor, ones like that at the start. Then, like a whole generation, I got the 2000AD benders! It was 2000AD that plunged me into the deep well of comics that I am yet to crawl back out of. And I don’t want to, there are many great wonders in it. But I also quickly got into even more mature comics, like Warrior and Escape. Interest in Superheroes was only a short concern for me, because the more indie stuff seemed so much more vital and moving. Of course Alan Moore, and also Eddie Campbell, Grant Morrison, Harvey Pekar, Joe Sacco. This is nothing new but Moore has deeply influenced me, as with many others. Not so much that you can see it in my writing, but in the stance of wanting to do work that matters to you, that has a high level of sophistication. The love of the medium as an artistic form of expression and exploration. Cheers big Al!

What was the draw of Japan for a Scottish born comic creator?  How important is where you live and where you come from in making comics?

The draw of Japan is still a mystery to me in one way, although in another way it’s very simple: the lovely women! I came here with a Japanese girlfriend and settled. Apart from that I also thought it would be useful to be in Japan to make an effort to get into working in the manga industry. Which has proven to be the case, through giving it a good go in approaching editors and publishers here, and a bit of luck.  But I often need to make it clear that I’m not an expert in manga, or in fact such a big fan. That sounds odd coming from someone who lives in Japan, works with Japanese artists and publishers everyday, and is the editor of one of the most respected manga anthologies yet to come out (AX), but its true! I’m too busy actually getting on with MAKING my books to have time to become an expert about manga in general. Paul Gravett is an expert. Ryan Holmsberg (who did the Ax bio section for us) is an expert. The only area of manga I am knowledgable in is the gekiga type, the mature, indie style. And even that is mostly because the Ax Japan editor, Asakawa-san, has told me about it.

YAKUZA MOON manga edition, art by Michiru Morikawa

Continue reading From Scotland to Japan – An Interview With Sean Michael Wilson

Lazy Sunday Comics

Edinburgh League of Comics is pleased to announce a comics drawing session at the Forest Cafe on Sunday the 28th of August.  It’ll be the last few days of the festival, and we’ve got planned a slothful, relaxed afternoon, aimed at hung-over adults and burned-out actors and comedians, and anyone else up for a carefree afternoon of drawing.  We’ll be occupying the front gallery of the Forest, drawing comics, creating weird characters, and reading comics all day.

We’ll be doing our usual drop in and draw activities – the fantastic ‘Character-O-Matic’ character creator, some Panel Scrabble remixing, and more.  Why not bring along some of your favourite comic books to share with everyone?

Inspired by the wonderful Calvin and Hobbes ‘Lazy Sunday Book’, Edinburgh League of Comics is hoping to bring that carefree Sunday feeling back to adults, perfectly placed at the end of the festival to offer the ideal recovery day.

Come along to Lazy Sunday Comics

@ The Forest Cafe (3 Bristo Place)

Sunday 28th August, 2pm – 8pm

(and onwards if we’re not feeling too lazy!)

Why not join our Facebook group for regular updates from the Edinburgh League of Comics!

Edinburgh Comics and Zine Fairs In August

Good news for comics fans coming to Edinburgh for the Festival is that there are a growing number of events on of interest to them.  There’ll be more news to follow on ELC’s own events, though I suggest you keep your diaries free for Sunday the 28th!

For now though, here’s some exciting information:

First off the awesome Zorras are hosting an Edinburgh Zine and Small Press Fair at the city’s beloved Forest Cafe on Sunday the 7th August (A.K.A. This Sunday!) from 12noon til 5pm.  I’m not sure how comic bookish the crowd is going to be, but I’m going to be there selling my own comics, as well as copies of We Are Words + PicturesPaper Science 5 anthology.

ZORRAS: “Zorras are hosting a zine and small press fair!! All tables are booked, and it’s going to be grand!  The fair runs from 12noon – 5.00pm.  There will be also readings/performances in the evening from about 6:00pm-9pm at an event called FACEPLANT. This means after the zine fair you can eat delicious Forest food and then sit back and enjoy!”

 

Then at the end of the month there’s going to be another zine fair, this time on the High Street, August 28th and 29th.  It’s called I’ve Zine You and is a celebration of all things self published.

IVEZINEYOU: “We think that there is just not enough being done to represent and support people who are spending hours creating amazing books, zines and comics. That is why we are hosting I’ve Zine You an independent publishing bookfair where sellers and fans can come together under on roof.

Come along to the Book Trust, 55 High Street, Edinburgh, EH1 1SR or to get involved email IVEZINEYOU@GMAIL.COM